Photo & Poem: Sunset to Dark

Talking with her while I walk the farm, I say look
what you’ve done with the new grass. Earth sends a
breeze to finger the dandelion fluff balls, a few seeds
released. I wonder if she’s forgotten the elm tree, twigs

barren of leaves so late in the spring. The growling
sound of the four-wheeler is the new neighbor who
has no livestock, who has already burned a track in
the fragile prairie grass running laps, traffic roaring

to the pond’s edge, pushing the Canada goose pair
to my pasture. I ask my friend, does she know, have
they quit their nest? She lets out a slow breath, the
wind comes to a rest as the sun rolls over the horizon,

each of Earth’s colors leaping up to the clouds, then
lingering to mourn the day, reluctant to be swallowed
by the dark. I wonder how many bittersweet sunsets
are left for me now. And does she wonder the same.

Anna Blake for Relaxed & Forward 

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Anna Blake

21 thoughts on “Photo & Poem: Sunset to Dark”

  1. Sometimes appears that people new to a rural area dont grasp the whole idea of respecting nature or neighbors (human kind or others). I’m so not a fan of 4-wheelers, snowmobiles. I remember (not fondly) a family who bought a place near me a few years ago – with a pond and a LAWN! Spent winter months (back when we actually had snow) running their snowmobiles (multiple) around the yard. I was told they asked one of my neighbors if they thought I would let them use my field to do the same – I have 4 acres here. Guess he must have told them not to bother asking!
    And yet – someone else bought that property a couple years later & so enjoyed their flowers, trees, watching the wildlife and really loving & caring for the place.
    All depends on the person, I guess.

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  2. Wow. Powerful on so many different levels. Joyful and sad — both at the same time. Made me think about our limited time here. “earth’s colors leaping up to the clouds and then lingering to mourn the day..” Just beautiful stuff. This one will stay with me.

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  3. Incredible picture. So sad about your neighbors. Just turned 70; still riding and enjoying nature, but I also wonder how many more wonderfuls, with wistfulness and appreciation.

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  4. Noisy contraptions making noise pollution is what those machines are. I hope you have some lively roosters who will let your neighbor know that nature has some noisy contraptions of her own and they rise at dawn! Or perhaps even a pair of the loveliest of noise-makers, the charming peacock?

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  5. Lovely , Anna. I’ve been thinking about your words, off and on, all day. I resonate with all the ideas here. My 4 wheeler pest is a very rich, powerful pipeline company that has seized property throughout the Hill Country and is currently putting in a pipeline. Crossing large ranches that have been in families for generations, tearing down 100 year old oak trees, and on and on. Such devastation ! We really fought them, to no avail. Eminent domain gives them that right to rob people of their property and devastate the land.

    oh, my, sorry about the rant.

    I, too, wonder how the Earth feels about how we humans treat her … we couldn’t blame her for a moment in she wanted to shake us off permanently ! I think perhaps there is a re-balancing going on now.

    Anyhow, thank you for the poem and the thoughts .

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  6. Anna, it has been hard to feel hopeful as of late. I worry too much about human lives, animal survival, climate changes, and the people in power that don’t share my concerns. I wonder if Mother Nature can keep all these things in balance in spite of us. Your poem today helped me remember how each Spring’s evidence of new life thrills and excites me as if it were the first time I had ever witnessed it. It’s a full time job staying focused on what is, as opposed to what might be, especially when that 4wheeler, hobby aircraft, or incessant leaf blower is competing with your soothing self talk. Thanks for letting us know we are not alone.

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